Newsroom

For media enquiries or more information about research at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, please contact Emily Wight, Communications Manager.

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Older couple using apps on an iPad.
New paper offers smart guidelines for developing tech tools for older adults Jun 21, 2018

“There are a lot of technology solutions that have the potential to help older adults, and people with dementia and their caregivers,” says Dr. Julie Robillard. “The problem is, most of them don’t get used. Technology that stays on the shelf doesn’t benefit anyone.”

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Pair of studies offers new insight into genetic, biochemical mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease Jun 18, 2018

Dr. Weihong Song has recently published two studies in the journal Molecular Psychiatry that provide insight into the genetic and biochemical mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Young boy resting in his bed with a sleeping dog.
Study finds important gaps, new research priorities in pediatric concussion Jun 12, 2018

“We were hoping to assemble neuroimaging data around concussion in kids to inform our research – instead we were surprised to find big gaps,” said Dr. Julia Schmidt, a post-doctoral fellow with Drs. Lara Boyd and Jill Zwicker. “Despite the prevalence and urgency of concussion, there were very few studies that looked at brain differences post-injury in children specifically.”

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Students working together in the library.
Learning by doing is better for retention than learning by watching Jun 5, 2018

Is picking up a new skill as simple as “watch and learn”? A new study from Dr. Naznin Virji-Babul and Dr. Nicola Hodges, published last week in the journal Neural Plasticity, is the first to show what happens when people learn new skills by observation, with findings that have implications for stroke recovery, education, and more.

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Dr. Cajal's Nobel Prize, by artist Armin Mortazavi.
Neuroscience through the ages makes neurohistory fun for everyone Jun 4, 2018

Pictured: an illustration from the comic on Santiago Ramón y Cajal by artist and science cartoonist Armin Mortazavi. For more of Mortazavi's work, visit the Neuroscience Through the Ages interactive timeline, or check out his website.

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Keith Cross, Chair PPRI, Dr. Matt Farrer, Bjorn Moller, PPRI Board Member, and Dale Parker, Past Chair, PPRI
Member news: May 2018 May 24, 2018

Pictured (left to right): Keith Cross, Chair Pacific Parkinson's Research Institute (PPRI), Dr. Matt Farrer, Bjorn Moller, PPRI Board Member, and Dale Parker, Past Chair, PPRI. Dr. Farrer gave the keynote address at the Porridge for Parkinson's event in West Vancouver on May 6.

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Pixelated apple over abstract background of binary code.
Pixelating the brain May 22, 2018

MS/MRI research group applies machine learning techniques to neuroimaging data.

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Pericytes in the brain.
Cooperation between brain cells regenerates cerebral blood flow after stroke May 16, 2018

Pictured: Pericytes (red) and blood vessels (green). Image source: Dr. Louis-Philippe Bernier, the MacVicar lab at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health.

During an ischemic stroke, a blockage in an artery prevents blood flow through the affected area of the brain, resulting in oxygen deprivation and cell death. Ischemic stroke, caused by blood clots, is the most common type of stroke.

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Man slacking off at work,
"Worker" and "slacker" rats show differences in decision-making processes May 14, 2018

A team of researchers led by Dr. Catharine Winstanley has identified differences in the brains of rats engaged in decision-making processes, revealing individual variability in cognitive effort and motivation and confirming that there is no one central decision-making region in the brain. 

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Pregnant woman in doctor's office.
New research investigates long-term effects of pre-birth exposure to anti-depressants on children 12 years later May 9, 2018

Selective serotonin reuptake (SSRI) antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is associated with better performance on a computerized task measuring cognitive skills in 12-year-olds, UBC researchers have found.

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